community

How to Make Friends

Are we too busy for community?

Are we too busy for community?

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Friends are people who make us happy and have similarities with us.  Look for a commonality or two and work from there.  Be honest and talk about the things that you like and hopefully the person  will like those things too. 

Are we too busy for community?

Are we too busy for community?

Are we too busy for community?

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Life is busy, we drive all over for work, friends and family but we know no one near home.  Joining groups (sport, book club, walking a dog) that have a second benefit to you makes good use of time and connects you with a handful of people, enough to say hi to in the street or at the shops. 

Volunteering benefits

Are we too busy for community?

Volunteering benefits

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Altruism is an act without personal gain, but it is debated that it could not exist as feeling good from the unselfish act of helping someone is rewarding.  Volunteering to help, especially if it is something you enjoy doing or have a skill in, is beneficial to all parties and has been known to change peoples lives. 

Stigma and Exclusion

High-rise communities

Volunteering benefits

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Sometimes we can be excluded for reasons that seem to band the group closer.  Differences are sometimes easier to see than similarities.  If the group is important to you, try to show how you are the same in other ways. 

High-rise communities

High-rise communities

High-rise communities

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How do you meet your local community when you live in a high-rise?  Isolation due to living alone can be very real so many developers are putting in shared garden and communal spaces to inspire residents to connect.  

Community in action

High-rise communities

High-rise communities

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A town in regional Victoria has banded together to make sure no person living alone is left alone. Based on direct evaluation, all people living alone gave insight into the amount of contact they would like with the community and an individualised system with the help from volunteers see people receive a letter, phone call or visit weekly, and so have a point of contact if they need help.  

Research

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Social Role Valorisation

Social Role Valorisation is a description of how people are devalued, assigned low-value roles, and treated poorly, simply because they differ from the social norm. The result is that people learn to only expect the lowest form of social role and don't realise that there is a choice.


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The Bystander Effect

Psychologists have proven that people offer less help when there are more people around.  It is perceived that others will help, thereby diffusing responsibility.  And so, people are less likely to be assisted by strangers when they live in crowded communities.